Last edited by Goltizilkree
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Parasitism of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs in Denver found in the catalog.

Parasitism of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs in Denver

by R.D. Averill

  • 200 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Parasitism,
  • Surveys,
  • Picea,
  • Orgyia pseudotsugata,
  • Hymenoptera,
  • Ova

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination4 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26492528M

    Moth caterpillars devour pine trees. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native to western North America, and its geographic range is coincident with the range of Douglas-fir; both species are found in British Columbia, all of the western states and the mountains of Northern Mexico. Their eggs are laid on the cocoon and will hatch in the.   Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia by Torgersen, Torolf R. cn; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.); United Service. cn.

    Black-tusked tussock moth caterpillars are munching fir trees along Colorado’s Front Range, spreading acr acres in one year and forcing a $, helicopter chemical assault to stop them. Potential Douglas-fir tussock moth damage in northern Idaho in based on a fall egg mass survey (Insect disease report) [Scott Tunnock] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

      The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native defoliator of Douglas-fir, true firs (such as grand fir) and spruce. For reasons unknown, a year or two prior to an outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moth on forested land, we tend to see defoliation of ornamental trees such as blue spruce. DecAID, the Decayed Wood Advisor for Managing Snags, Partially Dead Trees, and Down Wood for Biodiversity in Forests of Washington and Oregon. version Run DecAID. DecAID Science Team: Kim Mellen-McLean, Bruce G. Marcot, Janet L. Ohmann, Karen Waddell, Susan A. Livingston, Elizabeth A. Willhite, Bruce B. Hostetler, Catherine Ogden, Tina.


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Parasitism of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs in Denver by R.D. Averill Download PDF EPUB FB2

Parasitism of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs in Denver. Related Titles. Contained In: Technical report R2 - United States Forest Service, Forest Pest Management.

Nov (6) By. Averill, R.D. Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info. Subjects. Orgyia pseudotsugata, the Douglas-fir tussock moth, is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae first described by James Halliday McDunnough in It is found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Insecta. Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years.

Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks. ©Colorado State University Extension.

3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs. deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species.

Specifically, publications and 82 unpublished documents make some reference, at least, to the Douglas-fir tussock moth; 55 are concerned with other species in the same genus. Tussock Moth Control & Prevention. Douglas fir tussock moth caterpillars have a lot of natural predators in Colorado. Biological tussock moth control includes several species of parasitic wasp and tachinid fly that work as parasites on the larvae.

Spiders are one of the most effective predators, feeding on large populations of the caterpillar. Tussock moths in the genus Orgyia are small moths that are best-known because of their attractive larvae.

Figure 1. Fir tussock moth (Orgyia detrita) caterpillar (dorsal view). Photograph by Donald W. Hall, University of Florida. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir. Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province.

These outbreaks tend to last up to four years before natural controls such as predators, parasites, pathogens. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases. Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir trees throughout the semi-arid portions of British Columbia.

The sides and posterior portions of the caterpillar’s body are covered with hairy tufts that arise from small red nodes. Four thick, brown and cream-coloured tufts or brushes are found on its back. TwoFile Size: 1MB. Douglas-fir tussock moth larvae have to ingest the virus in order for it to infect the larval host.

The virus requires a living host or the DNA of live host cells in order to replicate itself. Under field conditions, tussock moth larvae ingest the polyhedral inclusion bodies containing virions or. QUICK GUIDE SERIES FM Douglas-fir Beetle About Douglas-fir Beetle Douglas-fir beetle (Dendroctonus pseudotsugae) is the most destructive bark beetle of mature Douglas-fir forests in western North America.

It is a native insect found throughout the range of its only host tree, Douglas-fir, from southern Canada to northern Size: KB. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseuclot-sugata, is one of the most injurious insect pests of Douglas-fir and true firs found in the West.

Out-breaks may develop explosively and when they do, the caterpillars will attack less preferred species such as pine, larch, spruce, and other species inter-mixed with Douglas-fir or true firs.

Life. Douglas-fir tussock moth spends the winter as an egg within the egg mass. Eggs hatch in the spring, often in late May, typically following bud break.

The small, hairy caterpillars migrate, moving to the new growth but also often dispersing upwards in the trees. This latter habit allows. th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J.

Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency Washington. For control of Douglas Fir Tussock Moths: In landscape plantings, pyrethroids such as permethrin (Astro), cyfluthrin (Tempo), bifenthrin (Talstar, Onyx) and lambda-cyhalothrin (Scimitar) are effective against Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars. Carbaryl (Sevin, Sevimol), teburenozide (Confirm, Mimic) and spinosad (Conserve) are alternative.

Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and damage The adult male is brown to gray and about 1 inch across and flies during the day in search of the wingless female moth. The larvae feed on pine needles and the mature larvae are about an inch long, hairy, gray or light brown, with black heads.

Douglas-fir is the preferred host, but pine, arborvitae, spruce, and true firs also are attacked. Biology and life history Larvae hibernate in dense clusters on twigs and become active on warm winter days.

At the end of the season, more than 3, eggs were collected and sent to the Canadian laboratory of Douglas-fir tussock moth expert Dr.

Imre Otvos. Larvae emerged from nearly 80% of the eggs in .The Douglas-fir tussock moth The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry-belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia.

Its distribution ranges from the lower mainland to Cache Creek, areas of the north and south Thompson Valley and into the Okanagan and Similkameen valleys. Outbreaks of tussock moth occur.Adult Douglas-fir tussock moth male. He is a dull, brown-gray, ordinary looking moth.

Table 1. Total Volume Decline l of Tree Mortality with [no treatment) Natural Degree of defoliation Estimate Class 1, Intensive Class II, Moderate Class III, Light Class IV, None OSU low1 Percent 84 84 Percent 16 19 34 Percent 0 Percent 0.